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General Statement. 



The Second Session of the University Summer School will be- 
gin on the morning of Tuesday, June 25 at 10 o'clock, and end on 
the evening of Friday, July 26. 

It is proposed to open all the resources of the University — books, 
apparatus, buildings, rooms, laboratories — to those who may attend. 

Twenty-two courses of instruction are offered in the two depart- 
ments comprising the school. In the Academic Department the 
following courses are offered: 

English Literature, Anglo-Saxon, History, Latin (3 courses), 
Greek, German (2 courses), French (2 courses), Algebra, Geometry 
Trigonometry, Chemistry and Physics. 

These courses are for the special benefit of young men and wo- 
men desiring university education, and for teachers seeking 
stronger academic equipment. The courses in Latin, German, 
French, Geometry and Trigonometry will be the same as those 
offered in the Fall Term of the University. Matriculated students 
and those intending to enter the University are allowed credit in 
the University for work done in the Summer School after careful 
examination and approval by the prof essors^n charge of the several 
departments. Opportunity is thus afforded young men of limited 
means to diminish the time required for graduation, while teachers 
of special subjects in the public or private schools by attending 
several sessions of the Summer School, may complete the course 
in any given study and receive a certificate 

In the department of Pedagogics the following subjects are 
offered: Herbartian Pedagogy, Educational Psychology, Algebra, 
Arithmetic, Grammar, Physiology, Geography, Geology, Science 
Teaching, Elementary Latin, Primary work in all subjects, Vocal 
Culture. 



4 UNIVERSITY 

This Department will seek to find the pedagogic basis of all sub- 
jects taught, to develop with the pupil an orderly, consistent body 
of educational doctrine, and to exemplify scientific methods of 
teaching the subjects forming the school curriculum. 

Miss Mathilde Coffin of Detroit, Michigan, one of the most 
celebrated primary teachers in America will have charge of the 
Primary Department from July 8—20. 

Miss Minnie Bedford of Raleigh, will conduct throughout the 
session a model primary class with special reference to the teach- 
ing of 'Spelling and reading by the phonic method so successfully 
used in the Raleigh Schools. 

The University Library, containing 30,000 volumes, will be open 
every day, affording unusual facilities for private reading under 
intelligent guidance. 

Students of the Summer School, not matriculated in the Univer- 
sity, may receive certificates of attendance and satisfactory work, 
duly signed by their instructors and by the President of the Uni- 
versity. 

Chapel Hill is delightfully situated in the hill country of North 
Carolina, The campus of 50 acres, the spacious buildings, and li- 
braries, and the beautiful scenery offer a most attractive place ol 
summer residence. 

Board at hotels for $15.00 per month, cheaper rates in private 
houses and clubs. All applications for board should be addressed 
to Mr. Thomas J. Wilson, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

At entrance students will enroll their names with the Registrar 
and pay the fees to the Bursar. 

Registration fee $1.00. Tuition fee $.500 This admits the stu- 
dent to all instruction. 






Faculty. 



Academic Department. 

KEMP P. BATTLE, LL. D., 

Professor of History, University of North Carolina 
History. 

JOSHUA W. GORE, C. E., 

Professor of Physics, Universit3 r of North Caroliua. 
Physics. 

WALTER D. TOY, M. A., 

Professor of Modern Languages, University of North Carolina. 
French and German. 

WILLIAM CAIN, C. E., 

Professor of Mathematics, University of North Carolina, 

Geometry and Trigonometry. 

THOMAS HUME, D. D., LL. D., 

Professor of English Literature, University of North Carolina. 
English Language and Literature . 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph. D., 

Associate Professor of ChemistiT, University of North Carolina, 

Chemistry , 



UNIVEBSITY 

JAMES T. PUGH, A. M., 

Instructor in Latin, University of North Carolina. 

Latin. 

HERMAN H. HORNE, A. B., 

Instructor in Modern Languages, University of North Carolina 
Instructor in French and German. 

THOMAS J. WIESON, A. B., 
Greek. 



Department of Pedagogics. 

EDWIN A. AEDERMAN, Ph. B., 

Professor of Pedagogics, University of North Carolina. 

Pedagogics. 

JOSEPH A. HOEMES. B. S. 

State Geologist. 
Lecturer on Geology. 

PHIEANDER P. CLAXTON, A. M., 

Professor of Pedagogics, State Normal School, 

Educational Psychology and Elementary Science. 
M. C. S. NOBEE, 

Superintendent Wilmington City Schools. 

/llgebra and Arithmetic, 



SUMMER SCHOOL. 

ALEXANDER GRAHAM, A. M., 

Superintendent Charlotte City Schools. 

Grammar and Physiology. 

LOGAN D. HOWELL, A. B., 

Superintendent Goldsboro City Schools, 
Elementary Latin. 

MATHILDE COFFIN, 
Assistant Superintendent Detroit City Schools. 
Primary Work. 

ELISHA B. LEWIS, 
Student of the Cook County Normal School. 

Geography. 

CLARENCE R. BROWN, 

Musical Instructor in Winston Schools and State Normal School. 

Vocal Culture. 

MINNIE REBFORD, 

Raleigh City Schools. 

Model Class in Primary Work. 



Courses of Instruction. 



Academic Department. 

CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND OF 
NOETH CAROLINA— DOCTOR BATTLE. 

Twenty-four lectures showing the constitutional development of 
the Union. The course will embrace: 

1. The Provisional Government by the Continental Congress. 

2. The constitution of the Confederacy and its defects. 

3. The steps leading to the constitution of the United States. 

4. The great questions which have arisen in regard to its con- 
struction. 

5. The leading cases by "which these questions were settled, 
especially the question and cases leading to and resulting from the 
civil war of 1861-'65. The leading questions of the colonial gov- 
ernment of North Carolina. The changes therein by the consti- 
tution of 1775, leading to the Eastern and Western contention, and 
the compromises of 1835. The subsequent changes in 1857, 1861, 
1867 and 1876. 

PHYSICS— PROFESSOR GORE. 

There will be twenty lessons on this subject, adapted to the 
needs of teachers in high schools and academies. The work will 
be by lecture and experiment in the physical laboratory. First 
and second weeks. 

1. The mechanical powers. 

2. Matter and some of its properties, 

3. Gravitation, 



STJMMEB SCHOOL. 9 

4. Composition of force. 
g. Energy and work. 

6. Hydrostatics, specific gravity. 

7. The air. Barometer, Pumps. 

8. Heat and some of its effects on matter. 

9. Heat engines. 

10. Meteorology. 

11. Sound: source, mode of propagation, reflection and interfer- 
ence. 

12. Musical sounds, harmonics. 

13. Light: velocity, reflection, refraction. 

14. Formation of images by mirrors and lenses. 
16. Optical prism, color, polarization. 

16. Magnetism. 

17. Batteries. 

13. Electro-dynamics. 
e9. Induced currents. 
20. Dynamo and motor. 

GERMAN AND FRENCH— PROFESSOR TOY AND MR. HORNE. 

German. Two courses will be offered, corresponding in part to 
the college German courses 1 and 2. 

1. Elementary Course. Five times a week. Mr. Home. 
Grammar. Translation of German prose. Harris's German 

Lessons. Storm's Immensee. 

2. Advanced Course. Five times a week. Professor Toy. 
Freytag's Die Journalisten. Sheldon's German Grammar. Har- 
ris's Composition. 

French. Two courses will be offered. In course 1 the grammar 
will be taught by oral practice and the class will read as much 
prose as possible. Course 2 will be devoted to rapid read- 
ing and practice in composition. These courses embrace part of 
the work of the College courses, French 1 and 2. 

1. Elementary Course, Five times a week, Mr. Home, 



10 UNIVERSITY 

Grammar. French prose. Chardenal's First French Course. 
Super's Reader. 

2. Advanced course. Five times a week. Professor Toy. 

Halevy's L'Abbe Constantin. Grandgent's Grammar and Mate- 
rials for Composition. 

MATHEMATICS— PROFESSOR CAIN AND SUPERINTENDENT NOBLE. 

1. A course in Wentworth's Algebra, with special reference to 
methods of teaching. Three hours. Superintendent Noble. 

2. A course in Wentworth's Plane Geometry. Five hours. Pro- 
fessor Cain. 

3. A course in Wentworth's Plane Trigonometry. Five hours. 
Professor Cain. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE— PROFESSOR HUME. 

1. A course in Anglo-Saxon, and parallel with it, a course in the 
Historical Development of the English Language, intended to be 
of practical benefit to teachers and to all who wish to have a scien- 
tific basis for the study of our grammatical forms and idioms, the 
derivation of our native words and our peculiar spelling. 

Twenty lectures with Cook's First Book in English, and Emerson's 
History of English as text, and references to Sweat and Skeat. 

2. A course in Literature. Discussion of the English History 
Plays of Shakspere with illustrative readings. Incidental atten- 
tion to the language and versification. The work of a Shakspere 
Club exemplified. 

Twenty Lectures as follows: 

1. Introductory on the Chronicle Plays and the Shakspere Cycle 
of Historical Dramas and on King John as the Prologue to the one 
continuous representation of English Life. 

2. Richard the Second, Marlowe's Edward the Second. Two lec- 
tures. 

3. Henry the Fourth, Part I. The first in a trilogy. The 
sources of the Play. The Percy of the Old Ballads, Three lec- 
tures, 



SUMMER SCHOOL. 11 

4. Henry the Fourth, Part II. The Strong King. Mingling of 
ideal and real. Comedy in history. Three lectures. 

5. Henry the Fifth. The Ideal King. Gradual transformation 
or sudden conversion? Dramatizing war. Two lectures. 

6. Henry the Sixth, Part I. Tests of authorship. The treatment 
of Joan of Arc's character. One lecture. 

7. Henry the Sixth, Part II. Jack Cade's Rebellion. Shaks- 
pere's politics. One lecture. 

8. Henry the Sixth, Part III. The Last of the Barons. Rela- 
tion of this play to Richard the Third. One lecture. 

9. Richard the Third. Peculiar method of characterization. 
Lowell's Theory of the Authorship. Versification. Violations of 
the unity of Time. Three Lectures. 

10. Three lectures on Tragedy, Comedy, Practical Ethics of 
Shakspere. 

CHEMISTRY— PROFESSOR BASKERVILLE. 

1. A course in General Chemistry. This course will be elemen- 
tary with numerous experiments illustrating the principles in- 
volved. 

2. A course in Laboratory Experiments supplementary to course 1. 
This course is intended especially for teachers. Opportunity is 
given for the performance of many of the experiments in course 1, 
whereby acquaintance with methods and skill in manipulation 
may be obtained. A fee of two dollars will be charged in this 
course to cover the cost of material and breakage of apparatus. 

Anyone desiring instruction in Qualitative and Quantitative 
Chemical Analysis, or Assaying will receive further information 
regarding courses in these lines on communicating with the pro- 
fessor. 

LATIN — MR. PUGH AND SUPERINTENDENT HOWELL. 

1. Livy. — Books XXI and XXII; critical reading with study of 
contemporaneous history. 



12 UNIVERSITY 

2. Latin composition based upon the text of Livy. 

2. Sight-reading. — Being practice in reading at sight passages 
of Livy not previously studied. 

Course 1 is identical with the work of the Freshman Class in the 
A. B. course of the University during the Fall Term. Members 
of the Summer School who complete this course may be credited 
with the same, if they afterwards enter the University, or they 
may receive certificates from the President of the University. 

4. Horace's Odes. — Critical reading and scansion. This course 
is mainly for study of style. Three hours a week. Mr. Pugh. 

5. A course for beginners. The aim of this course will be to 
teach the principal Latin forms and their use by an inductive study 
of some Latin text. 

6. A course in Csesar's Gallic War by the inductive method. 
Superintendent Howell. 

GREEK— MR. WILSON. 

There will be two courses offered in Greek: 

1. An elementary course for beginners. The aim of this course 
is to prepare the pupil for reading Xenophon's Anabasis. The 
work will be largely drill in forms, exercises and Greek compo- 
sition. Text book: White's Beginner's Greek Book. Five hours 
a week. 

2. A course in reading Xenophon's Anabasis: This course will 
be for those who have had some preparation in Greek. Text book: 
Goodwin's Anabasis or Anabasis with Selections from Herodotus. 
Five hours a week. 



SUMMER SCHOOL. 13 

Department of Pedagogics, 

PEDAGOGICS— PROFESSOR ALDERMAN. 

This course will aim to summarize briefly the influence of Rous- 
seau, Pestalozzi and Spencer upon educational thought, and to ex- 
plain at some length what is most suggestive in the Herbartian 
movement in Germany and America. 

There will be twenty lessons on Apperception, Interest, 
The Culture Stages, Concentration, Method and Manner, Govern- 
■ ment and Training, and the five essential steps of instruction: — 
preparation, presentation, association, the notional and applica- 
tion. An attempt will be made to test the validity of these steps 
upon typical subjects in history. These subjects will be selected to 
conform to the different stages of mental growth e. g. — Fairy Tales, 
Myths, Robinson Crusoe; Pioneer Stories, — Ulysses, Columbus, 
Daniel Boone; Olympic games, Crusades, Chivalry, Tournaments; 
Battles — Marathon, Bunker Hill, Guilford Court House; States- 
men — Jefferson and Jackson: Philadelphia Convention, Territorial 
growth, The Railroad, Tariff,. It is believed that an under- 
standing of these steps will enable teachers to prepare, arrange, 
and present the subject in any branch of study in an effective and 
scientific way. 

Text book: DeGarmo's Essentials of Method. 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY— PROFESSOR HOLMES. 

■ There will be a course of seven lectures on these subjects during 
the first ten days of the session. The central idea in the course 
will be to encourage and illustrate local studies by teachers and 
their pupils. The illustrations used will apply as far as possible to 
North Carolina localities; and during the afternoons those taking 
the course will make excursions into the country about Chapel 
Hill, for practical examinations of the geography and geology of 
the region. 
The five morning lectures will embrace the following subjects: 



14 UNIVERSITY 

1. The earth's surface: soils, rocks, plains, hills, ridges, moun- 
tains and valleys. 

2. Rain, wells, springs, rivers, drinking waters and water powers. 

3. The earth's crust: its general characteristics and the rocks 
and minerals and fossils of which it is composed and their trans- 
formation; its minor features such as folds, faults, dikes, mineral 
veins, etc. 

4. The growth of a continent; the physical history of a State 
(North Carolina). 

5. Economic Geology; mineral and ore deposits and their devel- 
opment; the natural wealth of the State and of the nation. 

The two evening lectures to be illustrated with the stereopticon 
will be on the following subjects: 

6. The greater mountains and river gorges of the earth's surface. 

7. The development of plant and animal life on the earth. 

EDUCATIONAL, PSYCHOLOGY AND ELEMENTARY SCIENCE — PRO- 
FESSOR CLAXTON. 

Twenty-five lectures will be given in the first course and fifteen 
in the second: 

1. Mind and body; experimental psychology; sense perception; 
memory; imagination — place in education; apperception; inter- 
est and attention; the general notion; object teaching; psychol- 
ogy of language; reasoning, inductive and deductive; the recita- 
tion; emotions — origin and direction; the will; moral training — dis- 
cipline; psychology of childhood; hereditary tendencies, ripening of 
instincts; doctrine of concentration; summary of educational prin- 
ciples. 

2. Purpose of psychological study; elementary concepts; physical 
and structural geography; political and commercial; aids; elemen- 
tary science; nature study as a basis for the arts of expression; the 
kindergarten — its relation to the school; geometry in elementary 
schools. 



SUMMER SCHOOL. 15 

ALGEBRA AND ARITHMETIC — SUPERINTENDENT NOBLE. 

1. The value of Algebra and its relation to the needs of the non- 
college man. Its proper place in a mathematical course of study. 
Special drill in the meaning and use of Plus and Minus. Factor- 
ing, &c. The instruction in this subject will apply mainly to meth- 
ods of teaching beginners. Students might bring any elementary 
Algebra for reference. Three hours a week. 

2. Tbe proper time to begin the study of Arithmetic. A study 
of objects resulting in the development of " The four Fundamental 
Rules;" the need of figures and signs; the proper use of signs; 
methods of drill in the use of figures; common and decimal frac- 
tions; object studies resulting in "rules" for the solution of frac- 
tional problems; a comparison of the arithmetic of fractions with 
the arithmetic of whole numbers; application of "The four Fun- 
damental Rules" to percentage, interest and all actual problems of 
business. Five hours a week. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND GRAMMAR— SUPERINTENDENT GRAHAM. 

1. Physiology. The work will include lectures on the anatomy, 
physiology and hygiene of the motory apparatus; the nutritive ap- 
paratus; the digestive organs; absorption; circulation; assimilation; 
respiratory organs; vocal organs; sensorial apparatus, including 
nervous system; poisons, antidotes, etc.; care and hygiene of the 
skin. Five hours a week. 

2. English Grammar. Introductory lectures on the English lan- 
guage; the sentence — grammatical and rhetorical classification; 
punctuation and capitalization; style and diction, grammatical pu- 
rity; propriety; precision. Formation of sentences will be consid- 
ered under the four following heads: Clearness, strength, unity, 
elegance. 

ELEMENTARY LATIN— SUPERINTENDENT HOWELL. 

1. A course for beginners. The aim of the course will be to 



16 VmYEBSITY 

teach the principal Latin forms and their use, by an inductive 
study of some Latin text. Those who complete this course will be 
able to read Caesar's Gallic War. Constant emphasis will be laid 
upon inductive methods of teaching the language to beginners, 
Five hours a week. 

2. A course for students who have read a little of Caesar's Gallic 
"War, or are prepared to begin it. The same methods will be fol- 
lowed as in course 1. Grammar will be studied in connection with 
the text read, and proficiency in translating Latin into idiomatic 
English will be aimed at. There will be continual practice in 
reading Latin at sight. In both courses it is desired to exemplify 
scientific methods of teaching the Latin language to young chil- 
dren. Five hours a week. 

ELEMENTARY INSTRUCTION IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS— MISS COFFIN. 

1. Elementary Instruction. — The nature of the child; the na- 
ture of the School; their relation to each other; the purpose of in- 
struction. 

2. The Curriculum. — History, science, and literature, its fund- 
amentals; their relation to each other; their relation to other sub- 
jects; unification and co-ordination of work. 

3. History in Elementary schools. — Place and purpose; sugges- 
tive courses; historical reading for different grades. 

4. History Story as a Mode of Thinking. — Choice of story; prepa- 
ration, presentation, reproduction, application, co-ordination with 
reading, language, etc; illustrative lesson. 

5. Literature in Elementary Schools. — Its place and purpose; 
choice of material — suggestive course; co-ordination with other 
subjects. 

6. Poem as a Mode of Thinking. — Illustrative lesson; presenta- 
tion, learning of; reproduction, educational value of this work. 

7" Nature Study in Elementary Schools. — Purpose and value 
of; Scope of the work; plant life, animal life, geography. 

8. Geography. — Elementary geography — what and how? rela- 
tion of elementary to foreign geography; Methods in advanced ge- 



SVMMEB SCHOOL. 17 

ography; Geographical reading for pupils; suggestive outline of 
subject in its relations. 

9. Reading as a Mode of Thinking. — Its relation to other modes 
of thinking; its relation to the study of history, geography and 
literature; desired results in the teaching of reading. 

10. Learning to Read. — Silent and oral reading, what each is, 
relation to each other, relative importance, principles governing 
teaching of each; the sentence, the unit — sentence method; sent- 
ences as wholes, analysis into words — word method; analysis of words 
into letters and sounds — spelling and phonics; idioms — work pre- 
paratory to learning to read; script and print. 

11. Acquiring a Vocabulary. — Size of vocabulary; choice of 
words; how to teach a word; written spelling; seat work. 

12. A Reading Lesson. — Preparation of child's mind for new 
thought; silent reading, oral reading, seat work. 

13. Reading. — Relative importance — time devoted to subject; 
supplemental reading — its functions and use; Material. — black- 
board lessons, charts, books; course of study suggested for pri- 
mary and grammar grades. 

14. Language Training. — Relation between thoughts and ex- 
pression; results aimed at in language training; relation of lan- 
guage work to all other branches; material for language les- 
sons. 

15. Oral Language. How oral expression is acquired; its re- 
lation to written expression; its place in language work in both 
primary and grammar grades. 

16. Written Language, — Copying, dictation, function and use 
of; composition — kinds: narrative, description and letter writing; 
original sentence making; paragraph making; thought organiza- 
tion the basis of fruitful composition work. 

11. Mechanics of Written Language. — Capitalization, punctua- 
tion, spelling and syllabification, indentation and margins, pen- 
manship, language forms. 

18. Arithmetic — Number as an element in thinking; relation of 
number to thought subjects; results aimed at in arithmetic teach- 
ing; selection and logical arrangement of subjects in arithmetic, 



18 tJNIVEBSIT? 

16. Whole Numbers. — Addition, substraetion, multiplication, 
division, and partition; when and how to teach each; selection 
and making of problems; working and explaining of problems, 
seat work. 

20. Fractions and Percentage. — Their relation to whole num- 
bers; their relation to each other; Where and how to teach them. 

GEOGRAPHY— ME. LEWIS. 

The Geography work will be principally in structural and climatic 
geography as presented by Humboldt, Ritter and Guyot. Those 
who attend the lectures are asked to bring with them some text 
book with good physical maps. Special attention will be given to 
best methods of presenting this subject in classes corresponding 
to fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grade classes in graded 
schools. Proper uses of map-drawing: moulding; modeling in 
sand; globes; mathematical geography; field lessons; plant and ani- 
mal life, phenomena of; study of soil and its formation; formation 
of continents; slope, the unit; land and water masses; winds and 
rains; distribution of heat; ocean currents; climate; continents and 
civilization; geography and history; proper co-ordination of geog- 
raphy, history and literature. Five hours a week. 

THE MODEL, CLASS— MISS EEDFORD. 

The work in this department will have a three-fold object: 

1. To furnish a school of observation. 

2. To drill teachers. 

3. To give teachers an opportunity to put in practice, under the 
supervision of the instructor, the lessons previously given to pu- 
pils and teachers. 

The Observation School. — This school will be composed of chil- 
dren of the village. The class will number six members, ranging 
in age from five to seven years, who have been taught nothing of 
spelling or reading. The purpose of the school will be to show . 
how young children should be taught to spell and to read, and how 



SUMMER SCHOOL. 19 

much progress in these arts can be made by little children attend- 
ing school two hours a day for five, weeks. The children will be 
taught by the phonic method. 

1. Pupils will be required to separate spoken words into their 
elementary sounds. The sounds are taught before the letter or 
symbols of those sounds in accordance with the principle, first the 
thing, then the symbol. 

2. The alphabet, the representatives of these sounds, will then 
be shown. 

3. Printing of simple words upon the blackboard from dictation 
relying upon the ear. The teacher speaking the word, the pupil 
giving its elementary sounds and printing the symbols. 

4. Reading of regular words without aid by giving at sight of 
each letter its sound and speaking the word called to mind by the 
sounds. Printed words containing diagraphs, dipthongs, etc. This 
method of teaching a child to read is the method of nature, and is 
fast superceding all other methods. ■ 

MUSIC— PROFESSOR BROWN. 

The general fee of $5.00 does not include tuition in music. Two 
courses are offered: 

1. Daily class lesson in sight-reading, scale-practice, rudiments 
of music for sight-singing and teaching the same, with choral 
practice. $1.00. 

2. Private lessons in voice-production, breathing, tone-placing 
and artistic singing, two half-hour lessons per week, during the 
month. $5.00. 

Books, music, etc., at lowest prices that can be secured from pub- 
lishers. 

EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE. 

Each day there will be a conference of the entire school for the 
discussion of vital matters relating to the theory and practice of 
teaching and to school administration. The city school superin- 
tendents and other prominent educators will lead in these discus- 
sions.